I want to do an “inspirational” post to help newbies see that affiliate marketing is a long-range game plan, not a “get rich quick” scheme. Looking for those willing to share how long it took to get the first affiliate sale and a bit of insight into how you did it. Of course, your name and your website/blog link will be included. You can share it here, or email me.
(i) You will include a date/time stamp adjacent to your display of pricing or availability information on your application if you obtain Product Advertising Content from Data Feeds, or if you call PA API or refresh the Product Advertising Content displayed on your application less frequently than hourly. However, during the same day on which you requested and refreshed the pricing and availability information displayed on your application, you may omit the date portion of the stamp. Examples of acceptable messaging include:
As a new affiliate marketer, you should be focused on how to construct your business. For example, creating a business plan for your business and learning how to market products online for free. Once you learn these skills, you get to keep them forever. Even if some software will do everything for you (and it won’t), how long will that last? Build a sustainable business instead.
What do you think you could honestly sell customers in the hopes that it would improve their day-to-day? For example, maybe you renovate homes and are always looking for the highest-quality paints or most eco-friendly cleaning solutions for bathrooms and kitchens. If you’re already knowledgeable about a market and have interest in it, that’s a great place to start.

(b) You will not sell, resell, redistribute, sublicense, or transfer any Program Content or any application that uses, incorporates, or displays any Program Content, PA API, or Data Feeds. For example, you will not use, or enable, or facilitate the use of Program Content on or within any application, platform, site, or service (including social networking sites) that requires you to sublicense or otherwise give any rights in or to any Program Content to any other person or entity, nor will you create links formatted with your Associates tag for, or display such links on, a site that is not your Site.
After being accepted into an affiliate program, marketers receive a unique URL that includes their affiliate ID. They share that unique URL with their subscribers, site visitors, and social networks via text links or ads. When someone clicks on that link, affiliate software records that click and any resulting product sales in the affiliate’s account. When commissions reach a pre-determined threshold, the affiliate is paid.
Most affiliate networks are known to have various payout models but the two most popular ones are Cost-Per-Sale and Cost-Per-Action. The former payout model usually pays a particular commission to an affiliate marketer after they refer a lead which converts to a sale. Most marketers like this model because they will only pay a small percentage after they are paid by the buying customer. Cost-Per-Action, on the other hand, pays affiliates after a specific action has been taken by the lead or referral. This payout model does not necessarily entail a direct sale and some of the most popular actions include opt-ins, registrations, sign-ups, impressions, form submissions or clicks.
Many merchants will still give credit for this sale to the affiliate, even though the visitor came directly to the site and not through an affiliate link when they completed their purchase. This is a fair solution in many cases, since many customers take time to make a decision and commit to a purchase. In the scenario above, the affiliate still provided a valuable service to the merchant–getting the customer to their site–and deserves to be compensated for that.
Cost per click was more common in the early days of affiliate marketing but has diminished in use over time due to click fraud issues very similar to the click fraud issues modern search engines are facing today. Contextual advertising programs are not considered in the statistic pertaining to the diminished use of cost per click, as it is uncertain if contextual advertising can be considered affiliate marketing.

Previously Buy.com, this is yet another huge affiliate network for e-commerce and which mostly focuses on physical products. While this network is relatively smaller compared to some of its rivals in the business with close to 1,000 partners, they are among the oldest affiliate programs and are fully dedicated to premium technology. This network offers hundreds of creative and as such, optimizing sales becomes easier through the use of technology like flexible linking options and rotating ads. This network deals with more than 90,000 products from close to 38,000 shop owners and has a staggering 18 million customers.


While any “regular” job requires you to be at work to make money, affiliate marketing offers you the ability to make money while you sleep. By investing an initial amount of time into a campaign, you will see continuous returns on that time as consumers purchase the product over the following days and weeks. You receive money for your work long after you’ve finished it. Even when you’re not in front of your computer, your marketing skills will be earning you a steady flow of income.
Since you’re essentially a freelancer, you get ultimate independence in setting your own goals, redirecting your path when you feel so inclined, choosing the products that interest you, and even determining your own hours. This convenience means you can diversify your portfolio if you like or focus solely on simple and straightforward campaigns. You’ll also be free from company restrictions and regulations as well as ill-performing teams.
Clickbank is undoubtedly huge and has been in the affiliate networks game for more than 17 years now. Being the large as well as long-standing affiliate network it is, Clickbank focusses on product launches, digital information, and many other marketing products. This network markets more than 6 million unique products which have been created by some of the most passionate entrepreneurs. Clickbank boasts delivering products which transform the lives of more than 200 million customers across the globe.
Amazing article. One question I have is about how to avoid the risk of FB terminating an ad account for using it to drive traffic to this kind of landing page. The first part of that question is, do you think a simple opt-in page like you described (with no content other than a "hook" that FB might argue is deceptive) would result in the ad being disapproved and possibly the ad account at risk of being terminated? The second part of the question is do you think the FB ad itself would need to be toned down, or do you think it's safe to just repeat the hook? It seems like FB is getting more and more strict about this kind of thing.
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