Don’t go too broad — Earlier, we mentioned that a benefit of affiliate marketing is that affiliates get to choose the products they sell. Because affiliates are building out their brands, they shouldn’t cast their nets too wide. There are affiliate opportunities for everything you can think of: technology, fashion, health, fitness, and even dog training. If you’re trying to get into affiliate marketing, try and stay relatively within a certain niche. 

A lot of the companies I want to feature on my site aren’t on affiliate networking platforms. Ive been reaching out asking if they would let me sell their stuff on my website with links but I’m not sure how much is safe to ask for for each purchase made through clicking on the link I provide. I’ve done a little research and 15-20% seemed like a safe starting point. What do you think?
People love to watch videos. Is it any wonder why Youtube and Facebook are competing for your videos? We've designed fully based video funnels to engage with your audience and drive conversions through the roof. Our videos are not salesly, they frame the problem and what kind of solutions can be found. They then ask for the click or the optin based on the landing page objective (redirect or collect leads, your choice)
People need to find your content in the first place. A flashy website is only as good as the sales it generates. No traffic equates to no sales, we’re afraid. Keyword research is really the only place the start. The sweet spot is finding a relevant keyword with a high search volume and a low difficulty score. Basically, a keyword that lots of people search for and no one is trying to rank for – that’s an SEO’s dream!

It’s also a really bad idea to rely solely on search engine traffic for your business. Google and other search engines like Bing and Yahoo change their search algorithms frequently. Many small online business owners have seen their affiliate business destroyed due to fluctuating search rankings. With so many possible traffic sources, never rely on just one.


Amazing article. One question I have is about how to avoid the risk of FB terminating an ad account for using it to drive traffic to this kind of landing page. The first part of that question is, do you think a simple opt-in page like you described (with no content other than a "hook" that FB might argue is deceptive) would result in the ad being disapproved and possibly the ad account at risk of being terminated? The second part of the question is do you think the FB ad itself would need to be toned down, or do you think it's safe to just repeat the hook? It seems like FB is getting more and more strict about this kind of thing.
iii. You will link each use of Product Advertising Content to, and only to, the relevant page of an Amazon Site (for example, the relevant Product detail page or other page to which particular Product Advertising Content most directly relates), and you will not link any Product Advertising Content to, or in conjunction with any Product Advertising Content direct traffic to, any page of a site other than an Amazon Site (however, parts of your application that are not closely associated with Product Advertising Content may contain links to sites other than an Amazon Site).
I do agree that my wording was a bit 'aggressive' in the video... With that said, I am still driving traffic from FB directly to landing pages that have ~15 words max on them, to this day! My ad copy and my landing page copy are super similar... And I get a high relevance score... I've had no problems at all. One thing I recommend is setting up a business.facebook.com account, then setting up as many ad accounts as you can (not adding any credit card to them, tho) to just have some extra accounts there... Just in case.
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