You will earn the Special Program Fee Rates described in this Section 4(b) in connection with “Trade-In Events” which occur when (1) a customer clicks through a Special Link on your Site to an Amazon Site and (2) during the resulting Session the customer adds a product to his or her trade-in shopping cart and then submits a trade-in request that Amazon accepts.

The best way to think about affiliate marketing is quality over quantity. There are a lot of small websites that will promote your product, but the key is finding a small number of partners that will deliver conversions. For example, an equity management services firm has over 20,000 affiliates in its system, but only about 25 affiliates generate 85 percent of revenue.
We will determine suitability at our sole discretion. If we reject your application due to unsuitable content, you may reapply at any time once you have complied with our suitability requirements. However, if at any time we 1) reject your application for any other reason or 2) terminate your account in connection with any violation or abuse (as determined in our sole discretion), you cannot attempt to re-join the Associates Program without our advance authorization. Advance authorization may be initiated by completing the Contact Associates Customer Service form available here.
I’d stick with Amazon if I were you. All of my Amazon sites only have Amazon affiliate links. If you use Google Adsense display ads on your site, you’re literally taking people away from your site for the sake of just a few cents with these type of ads. If you direct them just to Amazon, then you have a greater chance of earning more money from that click.
According to AM Navigator, in the United Kingdom, affiliate marketing has an ROI that amounts to $15 for every $1 spent. PRWeb states that at one point approximately 40% of Amazon’s revenue came from affiliates showcasing the power affiliate marketing can have on a brand. Retailers have noticed a conversion rate of 5% from visitors directed by affiliate links. The hardest part of building an affiliate program is finding affiliates who can drive converting traffic to your store. Yet store owners have a powerful ally in their loyal customers who can be rewarded for their referrals. Store owners can also reach out to affiliate marketers to cast a wider net of affiliates for their program.
Cost per action/sale methods require that referred visitors do more than visit the advertiser's website before the affiliate receives a commission. The advertiser must convert that visitor first. It is in the best interest of the affiliate to send the most closely targeted traffic to the advertiser as possible to increase the chance of a conversion. The risk and loss are shared between the affiliate and the advertiser.
If the above locations do not yield information pertaining to affiliates, it may be the case that there exists a non-public affiliate program. Utilizing one of the common website correlation methods may provide clues about the affiliate network. The most definitive method for finding this information is to contact the website owner directly if a contact method can be located.
Amazing article. One question I have is about how to avoid the risk of FB terminating an ad account for using it to drive traffic to this kind of landing page. The first part of that question is, do you think a simple opt-in page like you described (with no content other than a "hook" that FB might argue is deceptive) would result in the ad being disapproved and possibly the ad account at risk of being terminated? The second part of the question is do you think the FB ad itself would need to be toned down, or do you think it's safe to just repeat the hook? It seems like FB is getting more and more strict about this kind of thing.
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